How to Accomplish the Design Wanted Writing an Effective Design Brief
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How to Accomplish the Design Wanted Writing an Effective Design Brief

How to Accomplish the Design Wanted Writing an Effective Design Brief

Have a better understanding of needs of your clients and getting your clients to include each of these in their brief makes your job as a designer that much easier.
Moreover, it will give you directions and serves as a benchmark against which to test concepts and execution as you move through a project.
I divided this post into three main parts to help you understand how to write a great Design Brief:
  1. What’s a Design Brief?
  2. Useful questions that will help clients provide a clear Design Brief.
  3. The essential elements of a good Design Brief and an example template.

 

1. WHAT’S A DESIGN BRIEF?

 

A design brief is a written explanation given by the client to the designer outlining the aims, objectives, and milestones of a design project. A thorough and articulate design brief is a critical part of the design process. It’s a purpose is to get everyone started with a common understanding of what’s to be accomplished.

Some designers provide clients with their own set of questions. Even so, the ultimate responsibility for defining goals and objectives and identifying audience and context lies with the client.

There are some general guidelines to direct the process. Among them:

  • Provide a clear statement of objectives, with priorities.
  • Relate the objectives to overall company positioning.
  • Indicate if and how you will measure achievement of your goals.
  • Define, characterize and prioritize your audiences.
  • Define budgets and time frames.
  • Be careful about procedural requirements.

 

2.USEFUL QUESTIONS THAT WILL HELP CLIENTS PROVIDE A CLEAR DESIGN BRIEF.

 

What does your business do?

What does your company/organization do?

What is your company’s history?

What are the goals? Why?

What is the overall goal of the new design project?

What are you trying to communicate and why?

Are you trying to sell more products or get awareness of your product/service?

How do you differ from your competitors?

Who is the target market?

What are your target market’s demographics and psychographics? Examples: the age, gender, income, tastes, views, attitudes, employment, geography, lifestyle.

What are the specifications?

What size is the design going to be?

Where is it going to be used?

What other information should the designer know as regards specifications?

Have you got a benchmark in mind?

You should provide the designer with some examples of what you consider to be effective or relevant design even if it is from your main competitors.

Provide things not to do, and styles that you do not like or wish to see in your design. This will give the designer an idea of what to avoid.

What is your budget?

Providing the budget upfront also allows designers to know if the project is going to be worthwhile to complete. Make sure you are worth their time.

What is the timescale/deadline?

Give the designer a detailed schedule of the project and set a realistic deadline for the completion of the work. You should take into account the various stages of the design project such as consultation, concept development, production, and delivery.

3. THE ESSENTIAL ELEMENTS OF A GOOD DESIGN BRIEF.

 

  • BASIC PROJECTS AND GOALS
  • TARGET AUDIENCE AND BACKGROUND
  • TIMINGS AND DEADLINES
  • MATERIALS
  • FORM, SIZE, STYLE, AND COLORS
  • BUDGET
  • BENCHMARK

 

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